Biggest leaves, smallest pun’kin

The days of falling leaves are almost over.  A few stragglers remain in the poplar tops and some oaks will keep their rusty decorations till March.  The treetops often hold larger leaves than lower branches and a young Burr oak provided some trophy specimens this year.

Burr oak leaves

 

The Bluecircle leaf “grand champion” was a 5-year Sycamore that blanketed its lawn on North Watervliet Road with fallen giants.   Many had a span over 12 inches, and some were larger.   It was good that this naturalized area needs no raking – by Spring these enormous remnants of a good tree year will be gone.

Sycamore leaf measures 18 x 16 inches!

One pumpkin vine survived the groundhog chomping in the corn patch and bore a single tiny fruit. Maybe a fairy carriage?

Tiny pumpkin

Advertisements

Seven Bluecircle Years

The Red Oak leaves brown and blow on a howling Halloween and the tree farm has reached another birthday.  Occasional bursts of lake-effect snow from a lead-lined sky warn of harsh weather ahead, but for now the grass is green.  Freed from competition by frost-pruned weeds it’s growing thanks to lots of October rain.  It will be left a little long  where there are not too many leaves to mulch or move.

A rabbit, or maybe 2 elude the clutches of our resident fox by living beneath the largest Scotch Pines.  Those planted as 3-year seedlings are now almost 9 years old.  Volunteer raspberry and blackberry vines like the pines too, waiting to grab the sleeve or hat of the guy on the mower.  Poison ivy that stealthily made its way up trunks all summer is now bright red and obvious – but only until the next hard rain sweeps the leaves away.  The myth that this vine only thrives in shade is busted on the Bluecircle since it’s everywhere the mower blades don’t reach.

Spagetti squash proved to be the champion crop of this year’s garden.  The pepper and tomato plants and never fully recovered from a late frost, and a groundhog that tunneled into the sweet corn/pumpkin patch feasted on the young vines.  Soon it will be time to clean out the beds, hang up the tools and wait to anticipate the first signs of Spring.